Callanish Standing Stones

A Archaeological Site in Outer Hebrides

Photo - Callanish Standing Stones

In the absence of any sure knowledge, theories as to the meaning and purpose of such stone structures abound. Many adhere to the belief that they were used in rituals relating to the moon, stars and the position of the distant hills. Whatever inspired their construction, all agree that the experience of visiting the Standing Stones of Calanais is not to be missed.

Callanish Standing Stones

Calanais
Isle of Lewis
HS2 9DY
T 01851 621422
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The Private House Stay's Guide

Outer Hebrides

The Outer Hebrides is a chain of islands over 100 miles long, (the Inner hebrides are islands between the Outer Hebrides and the mainland of Scotland). They have west coast beaches that rival the Caribbean - as highlighted in the Sunday Times when Luskentrye beach on Harris was considered to be in the top 10 of beaches in the world. There are also many sites of international archaeological significance such as the Callinish Stones on Lewis which are over 5000 years old and some believe older and more relevant than Stonehenge. The Outer Hebrides are the last bastion of the old Highland life. Though newer industries such as fish farming have been introduced, the traditional occupations of crofting, fishing and weaving still dominate, and outside Stornoway on Lewis (the largest town within the islands) life is very much a traditional one, revolving around the seasons and the tides.